Russia and the United States: Nuclear Arms Race 2.0

By: Maggie Winding Eight years ago, in 2010, the United States and Russia signed a treaty committing to keep their long-range ballistic missiles at the lowest levels since the beginning of the Cold War. The Treaty, known as the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START- the original was drafted in 1991), was enacted on February…

Brexit’s Only Border

By: Ryan Bergal Since Brexit negotiations opened between the United Kingdom and the European Union in June of 2017, the discussion on what to do with the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland has been, for all intents and purposes, ambiguous. There has been extensive commentary on how the UK will be…

The Real Problem with Trump’s Jerusalem Declaration

By: Sam Alhadeff In President Trump’s State of the Union address last month, he reminded the world of one of his landmark foreign policy accomplishments from his first year: recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. A lot has been made of the decision. Trump’s supporters have praised his move for fulfilling a campaign promise….

Progressive Saudi Arabia and What it Means for the Political Sphere

By: Ashley Levi The specter of a new age of progressivism in Saudi Arabian politics came into sharper focus when Mohamed Bin Salman, the 32-year-old son of King Salman, was appointed crown prince in June of 2017. He instituted many reforms in Saudi Arabia’s society and legal structure, including an expansion of women’s rights by…

The Rohingya Crisis is Myanmar’s Governance Crisis

By: Cherui Chew The persecution of the Rohingya Sunni Muslims in Buddhist-majority Myanmar is in the international spotlight recently. U.N. officials have not officially labeled the Rohingya crisis as a genocide despite the evidence of atrocities, such as rape and murder, perpetrated by Myanmar’s armed forces against the Rohingya. The systematic persecution led to an…

Living with the Past: Reconciliation in Post-Khmer Cambodia

By: Aly Niehans Cambodia is a small country nestled between Vietnam and Thailand famous for sprawling temples built by the great ancient Angkor civilization, lush rice fields, and genocide. After years of waging war in rural Cambodia, the Communist rebel group known as the Khmer Rouge ousted the Lon Nol regime from power in 1975…

Trump’s Policy Decisions Further Isolate the U.S. from Asia

By: Cherui Chew Amidst fanfare and lavish treatment by Asian leaders, President Trump recently concluded his 12-day Asia trip. This included a stop at Da Nang city for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit. The North Korean nuclear threat and U.S. trade deficit were two issue areas that Trump focused on when visiting Japan, South Korea,…

Brexit Negotiations Intensify As First Phase Concludes

By: Emily Janicik As the European Union and the United Kingdom close the first round of negotiations this week, Britain is one step closer to fully exiting the EU. After Prime Minister Theresa May of the UK and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker made a joint announcement that the two parties have made “sufficient progress,”…

From Coffee to Memes: A Brief History of Free Spaces

By: Derrick Gozal Something is wrong with the Internet. Or at least, that is the impression one often gets from popular media. From foreign manipulation of elections to society’s ever increasing political polarization, all stories point to the internet as the primary culprit. These are all valid points, and yet they all seem to be…

Bitcoin: Too Early to Talk About Future of the Currency?

By: Soeun (Sarah) Lee The price of Bitcoin hit $17,000 on Thursday, December 7. Starting from below $1,000 at the beginning of the year, it has reached $14,000, $15,000, and even $19,000 all in seven days. The market value of Bitcoin has passed $271 billion, which is greater than 488 of the Standard & Poor’s…