Paper or Plastic?

By: Matthew Quraishi-Landes On April 20, 2018, two days before Earth Day, countries convened in New York to explore possible solutions to this year’s Earth Day theme: “Kicking the Plastic Bag Addiction: A Plan for Response to Plastic Pollution”. Among nations present were France, Mexico, Rwanda, Morocco, and other European Union nations who presented possible strategies…

RUN DFC: The BUILD Act

By: Kelli Liegel In today’s highly-polarized political climate, it is rare to see overwhelming bipartisan support regarding policy issues. Defying this norm, on February 27th, Ted Yoho (R-FL), Adam Smith (D-WA), Bob Corker (R-TN), and Chris Coons (D-DE) introduced a new bill to Congress that they believe everyone can get behind. The BUILD Act, which…

Peak Oil Demand: Political and Economic Consequences

By: Ryan McGuine and Sam Alhadeff In 1956, Shell geologist M. King Hubbert predicted that American oil production would peak in 1970 and decline from then on and that worldwide production would do the same sometime around 2000. This narrative, known as “peak oil supply,” predicted that as humans use increasing amounts of oil, existing…

Elections in Azerbaijan: A Win for Democracy’s Favorite Dictator

By: Jack Urban On April 11, 2018, Ilham Aliyev was re-elected to a fourth term as President of Azerbaijan. Despite Azerbaijan’s close ties to the West, their standing as the first Muslim majority secular country in the world, or their massive oil reserves, this event went largely unnoticed by the world. Moreover, in order to…

Wir Schaffen Das: Is it a Reality?

By: Emily Janicik Angela Merkel’s famous slogan “wir schaffen das,” which she originally introduced in 2015 in response to the refugee crisis in Europe, translates in English to “we can do it.” After three years of tackling the difficult issue of world migration, however, many Germans are becoming disillusioned with this sentiment. In 2015, Germany…

Hungary’s Election: What Does This Mean for the EU?

By: Julie Schneiberg On April 8th, 2018, Viktor Orbán won a landslide election for his fourth term as the Prime Minister of Hungary. Orbán, a member of the national conservative Fidesz party, is known for his autocratic behavior and anti-immigration policies. He holds strong relationships with other autocratic leaders, such as Vladimir Putin in Russia…

Poverty in Haiti: An Exposé

By: Ryan McGuine Today, Haiti is the poorest country in the western hemisphere, infamous for countless debilitating natural disasters as well as for a rampant sex tourism industry. Last summer, NPR ran a story about the sorry state of the country’s sewage system, including a cameo for a Haitian who cleans latrines for a living…

April Protests Drawing on a New Democracy for Armenia?

By: Arriana Dawidziak April 2018 was a month marked by transparent change for the country of Armenia, challenging where exactly power should be held in the government system and who should be allowed to have it. In light of a newly elected prime minister belonging to a party that has ruled Armenia for 20 years, criticism…

Are Missiles the Answer?

By: Ilana Friedman The conflict in Syria began in March 2011 with pro-democracy demonstrations against the harsh regime of President Bashar al-Assad. In August 2011, then-President Obama called for Assad to step down and also enforced new sanctions on the Syrian government. Allies of the United States — France, Germany, and the United Kingdom —…

The Khartoum Mistake

By: Emily Wurst Khartoum – the capital city of Sudan, and the namesake of a process that threatens the wellbeing of thousands. The Khartoum Process, otherwise known as the ‘EU-Horn of Africa Migration Route Initiative’, was established in 2014 as a “platform for political cooperation among the countries along the migration route between the Horn…