RUN DFC: The BUILD Act

By: Kelli Liegel In today’s highly-polarized political climate, it is rare to see overwhelming bipartisan support regarding policy issues. Defying this norm, on February 27th, Ted Yoho (R-FL), Adam Smith (D-WA), Bob Corker (R-TN), and Chris Coons (D-DE) introduced a new bill to Congress that they believe everyone can get behind. The BUILD Act, which…

The Khartoum Mistake

By: Emily Wurst Khartoum – the capital city of Sudan, and the namesake of a process that threatens the wellbeing of thousands. The Khartoum Process, otherwise known as the ‘EU-Horn of Africa Migration Route Initiative’, was established in 2014 as a “platform for political cooperation among the countries along the migration route between the Horn…

Murders in Virunga National Park: Are Humans Safe From Being Hunted?

By: Samantha Mintz-Agnello On Monday, April 9, 2018, six people were murdered in the Virunga National Park located in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). As Africa’s oldest national park, on the border of Uganda and Rwanda, the Virunga National Park works to protect and preserve endangered species and wildlife, the most notable being the highly-endangered…

Is Microfinance the Universal Poverty Reduction Tool?

By: Maggie Winding Microfinance and micro-loans have, since their conception, been hailed as a “miracle tool” for alleviating poverty in developing countries. Many, however, myself included, remain unconvinced that microfinance is necessarily the solution to resolving the vast disparity in economic achievement that many nations face. Therefore, as a deeper exploration of this topic, this article…

The Horror of Being Kidnapped: How the Nigerian Government Should Respond

By: Ilana Friedman April 14th, 2014 was a day of horror for the 250 girls who were seized from their school by the Nigerian Islamist extremist group Boko Haram. Boko Haram translates to “Western education is forbidden,” expressing hatred the group has for Western culture. Some girls, as young as eleven, have been able to…

“Day Zero”: Cape Town’s Water Crisis Pushed to Catastrophic Levels

By: Caitlin Attaway Cape Town, South Africa is quickly becoming the catalyst in the global climate change debate. A city once seen as a model for its pioneering work on creating campaigns to promote sustainable water usage, Cape Town has found itself in a state of despair over a once in every 384-year drought that has…

With the World Watching, Robert Mugabe’s Insurgency sets a Dangerous Precedent

By: Simon Fischer Former Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe finally resigned on November 21, 2017, after facing intense scrutiny from many and being placed under house arrest by the military. The uproar began after he fired his Vice President, Emmerson Mnangagwa, clearing a path for his wife, Grace, to take over as his successor. Initial rejoicing by…

Niger: The United States Next Target For The War On Terror?

By: Caitlin Attaway The death of four American troops in Niger this past October lifted the curtain on United States involvement in West Africa. Since the attack, questions have arisen with regard to the purpose of the troops stationed in Niger. The United States’ growing interest in this country seems to suggest that its “War…

Lifting the Elephant Trophy Ban: Unethical and Not Saving Anyone

By: Samantha Mintz-Agnello As of Wednesday, November 15, 2017, the Trump administration has made plans to lift the 2014 ban, made during the Obama administration, on the import of “trophy” elephants. The potential lift on this ban would mean that elephants killed in Zimbabwe and Zambia could be brought into the United States. The ban…