Notre Dame Cathedral Scarred by Fire

By: Meredith Antell Paris residents watched as the Notre Dame cathedral, the symbol of beauty and history of Paris, was damaged by a dramatic fire last Monday evening. Completed in the 13th century, the cathedral has served as a landmark for Paris, attracting around 13 million people each year — nearly double the visitors of…

The Ukrainian Election: TV Star Turned Presidential Frontrunner

By: Daniel Zaydman On March 31, over eighteen million Ukrainians went to the polls for the first time since the 2014 Ukrainian Revolution. Volodymyr Zelensky, a comedian who plays the Ukrainian President on the wildly-popular satirical television series Servant of the People, came out in first place with over 30 percent of the popular vote in…

God Remain the Queen

By: Michael Sauer David Cameron was cornered. The brash, anti-EU United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) was exploiting Europe’s migrant crisis for the political windfall, chiseling into the Conservative majority in the House of Commons. UKIP wanted out of the European Union and promised to upset the nation’s political fabric at great cost to accomplish that…

The Gulf Crisis Taints 2022 World Cup Tournament in Qatar

By: Mollie Crook Over a decade ago, it was announced that Qatar would host the 2022 World Cup. This was a decision engulfed in controversy from the very beginning, when it was rumored that the Qatar 2022 World Cup bid team ran a secret campaign in 2010 in an attempt to sabotage competing countries’ bids to…

The Russian Constitutional Court’s review of the Chechen-Ingush Land Swap

By: Jared Lang On November 27th, the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation began to review the controversial land transfer deal between the Russian republics of Ingushetia and Chechnya. The deal itself is much-debated, but the fact that the federal Constitutional Court is weighing in on the issue almost overshadows the deal itself in importance….

A Sustainable Approach

By: Chandrea Baster    Pollution is a serious problem plaguing our world today. Regardless of the source, it is something that impacts our daily lives and is a severe issue that needs mending. Pollution has a variety of different origins; factories, industrial facilities, trucks, and automobiles all contribute to the amount of pollution in our air….

US Foreign Policy in the 116th Congress

By: Daniel Ramallo In an election dominated by healthcare, immigration, and everything President Trump, the foreign policy debate was characteristically quiet, despite potentially large policy implications stemming from the results of November 6th. Despite what appeared to be a repudiation of Trump’s nationalism on election night, the President’s foreign policy agenda is safer than one might…

Denmark’s Newest Human Rights Concern: Lindholm

By: Eva Branson Today, the deserted Danish island, Lindholm, is home to research labs that investigate viruses ailing cattle and swine. Researchers elected to conduct their work on Lindholm due to its isolation, limiting politicians’ and citizens’ concerns about potential contagion. In 2021, however, the research labs will be removed, and a brand new deportation center…

Is Brexit Going to do More Harm than Good?

By: Ilana Friedman Britain is in the process of exiting the European Union (EU) through Brexit. Brexit has been a long debate for five years now. As the date gets closer for the exit, people are getting nervous about what the future holds for the United Kingdom’s economy. In 2013, Prime Minister David Cameron said he…

This isn’t the Soviet Union, but Russia will still work you to death

By: Julie Schneiberg In 2005, President Vladimir Putin announced on a televised Q&A session that the Russian people would not see a rise to the pension age so long as he was president. Fast forward thirteen years and multiple terms, Putin remains president, but he has failed to keep his promise to the Russian people. On…