Syria: Russia’s Hope for Relevance in the Middle East

By: Jared Lang From the conventional perspective on recent Russian foreign policy, getting involved in the Syrian Civil War appears to break from Putin’s playbook. When it comes to foreign conflicts, Putin has, since his ascendence to the Russian presidency in 2000, deployed armed forces almost exclusively in the countries immediately neighboring the Russian Federation…

Elections in Azerbaijan: A Win for Democracy’s Favorite Dictator

By: Jack Urban On April 11, 2018, Ilham Aliyev was re-elected to a fourth term as President of Azerbaijan. Despite Azerbaijan’s close ties to the West, their standing as the first Muslim majority secular country in the world, or their massive oil reserves, this event went largely unnoticed by the world. Moreover, in order to…

Wir Schaffen Das: Is it a Reality?

By: Emily Janicik Angela Merkel’s famous slogan “wir schaffen das,” which she originally introduced in 2015 in response to the refugee crisis in Europe, translates in English to “we can do it.” After three years of tackling the difficult issue of world migration, however, many Germans are becoming disillusioned with this sentiment. In 2015, Germany…

Hungary’s Election: What Does This Mean for the EU?

By: Julie Schneiberg On April 8th, 2018, Viktor Orbán won a landslide election for his fourth term as the Prime Minister of Hungary. Orbán, a member of the national conservative Fidesz party, is known for his autocratic behavior and anti-immigration policies. He holds strong relationships with other autocratic leaders, such as Vladimir Putin in Russia…

April Protests Drawing on a New Democracy for Armenia?

By: Arriana Dawidziak April 2018 was a month marked by transparent change for the country of Armenia, challenging where exactly power should be held in the government system and who should be allowed to have it. In light of a newly elected prime minister belonging to a party that has ruled Armenia for 20 years, criticism…

Murder, Protests, and Resignations: Corruption in the Slovakian Government

By: Jack Urban On February 25 Ján Kuciak, a Slovakian investigative journalist for left-leaning Aktuality.sk, and his fianceé, Martina Kušnírová, were murdered in their home in Vel’ká Mača, Slovakia. Seven suspects were arrested in connection with the murders, but all were released without charge. Before his murder, Kuciak had been looking into the alleged theft…

Gun Violence in Schools: A European Perspective

By: Nick O’Connell Too often, American citizens have experienced mass shootings in schools across the country, with Parkland being the latest example. Pundits, citizens, and politicians all weigh in to denounce these events, but ideas on how to stop this kind of violence often polarize the debate. Gun control is central to this conversation, dividing the…

Small Terrorist Attack in France Adds to Big Debate

By: Julie Schneiberg On Friday, March 23th, tragedy struck in Trèbes, France, a small town that lies roughly 60 miles southeast of Toulouse. Islamic extremist Radouane Lakdim, a French-Moroccan of dual citizenship, first hijacked a car where he shot and wounded the driver and killed a passenger. He then proceeded to leave the car in…

Tomorrow’s Warfare, Held Back By Today

By: Sam Buisman Entering into a war is like stepping into a river: while the environment is familiar, your immediate surroundings are constantly changing. War always involves a number of opposing parties engaged in armed conflict, but the means by which it is waged have changed drastically over time. “Armed” embodies a different definition for…