The Russian Constitutional Court’s review of the Chechen-Ingush Land Swap

By: Jared Lang On November 27th, the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation began to review the controversial land transfer deal between the Russian republics of Ingushetia and Chechnya. The deal itself is much-debated, but the fact that the federal Constitutional Court is weighing in on the issue almost overshadows the deal itself in importance….

A Sustainable Approach

By: Chandrea Baster    Pollution is a serious problem plaguing our world today. Regardless of the source, it is something that impacts our daily lives and is a severe issue that needs mending. Pollution has a variety of different origins; factories, industrial facilities, trucks, and automobiles all contribute to the amount of pollution in our air….

US Foreign Policy in the 116th Congress

By: Daniel Ramallo In an election dominated by healthcare, immigration, and everything President Trump, the foreign policy debate was characteristically quiet, despite potentially large policy implications stemming from the results of November 6th. Despite what appeared to be a repudiation of Trump’s nationalism on election night, the President’s foreign policy agenda is safer than one might…

Denmark’s Newest Human Rights Concern: Lindholm

By: Eva Branson Today, the deserted Danish island, Lindholm, is home to research labs that investigate viruses ailing cattle and swine. Researchers elected to conduct their work on Lindholm due to its isolation, limiting politicians’ and citizens’ concerns about potential contagion. In 2021, however, the research labs will be removed, and a brand new deportation center…

Is Brexit Going to do More Harm than Good?

By: Ilana Friedman Britain is in the process of exiting the European Union (EU) through Brexit. Brexit has been a long debate for five years now. As the date gets closer for the exit, people are getting nervous about what the future holds for the United Kingdom’s economy. In 2013, Prime Minister David Cameron said he…

This isn’t the Soviet Union, but Russia will still work you to death

By: Julie Schneiberg In 2005, President Vladimir Putin announced on a televised Q&A session that the Russian people would not see a rise to the pension age so long as he was president. Fast forward thirteen years and multiple terms, Putin remains president, but he has failed to keep his promise to the Russian people. On…

Sexual Assault Worldwide: From the Catholic Church to the US Supreme Court

By: Samantha Mintz-Agnello Sexual assault is an issue that prevails throughout society, specifically when those in power exert it over their victims. Reports of sexual assault and misconduct are not new to the Catholic Church. Unfortunately, there treatment of victims and survivors is horrifying. Pope Francis stated on Saturday September 29 that he wants people…

Syria: Russia’s Hope for Relevance in the Middle East

By: Jared Lang From the conventional perspective on recent Russian foreign policy, getting involved in the Syrian Civil War appears to break from Putin’s playbook. When it comes to foreign conflicts, Putin has, since his ascendence to the Russian presidency in 2000, deployed armed forces almost exclusively in the countries immediately neighboring the Russian Federation…

Elections in Azerbaijan: A Win for Democracy’s Favorite Dictator

By: Jack Urban On April 11, 2018, Ilham Aliyev was re-elected to a fourth term as President of Azerbaijan. Despite Azerbaijan’s close ties to the West, their standing as the first Muslim majority secular country in the world, or their massive oil reserves, this event went largely unnoticed by the world. Moreover, in order to…

Wir Schaffen Das: Is it a Reality?

By: Emily Janicik Angela Merkel’s famous slogan “wir schaffen das,” which she originally introduced in 2015 in response to the refugee crisis in Europe, translates in English to “we can do it.” After three years of tackling the difficult issue of world migration, however, many Germans are becoming disillusioned with this sentiment. In 2015, Germany…