Israeli Prime Minister and his Legal Woes

By: Rachel Watson Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel is at risk of losing the April 9 election due to legal issues after 13 years in office. The charges that have been brought against Netanyahu are fraud, bribery, and breach of trust in connection to three separate cases. One such case is Case 1000, which centers…

Contentious Partnership: The U.S. Military Withdrawal from Syria

By: Ariana King On December 19th, 2018, President Trump announced that the United States would withdraw 2,000 troops from Syria within 30 days, claiming that the Islamic State (IS), an Islamist extremist group, had been defeated and that U.S. troop presence was no longer necessary.  This decision was met with significant domestic and international criticism. National…

A Taliban Resurgence: Investigating U.S. Counterinsurgency Mistakes

By: Ariana King As of January 19th, U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad has individually met with all parties involved in the seventeen-year-long war that began with the 2001 U.S. ouster of the Taliban government. The Taliban is an Islamist extremist group which has imposed harsh Sharia law on the Afghan people and which…

US Foreign Policy in the 116th Congress

By: Daniel Ramallo In an election dominated by healthcare, immigration, and everything President Trump, the foreign policy debate was characteristically quiet, despite potentially large policy implications stemming from the results of November 6th. Despite what appeared to be a repudiation of Trump’s nationalism on election night, the President’s foreign policy agenda is safer than one might…

Mission Accomplished?: Why Trump can’t withdraw troops in Syria

By: Daniel Yun On January 16th, 2019, four Americans were killed by an Islamic State suicide bomber in Syria. This incident came weeks after President Donald Trump declared the war against ISIS won and ordered the withdrawal of the 2,000 American special forces operators currently located in Syria. Former Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and…

Saudi Arabian Women Can Now Drive: What Still Needs to be Done

By: Samantha Mintz-Agnello On Sunday, June 24, 2018, the ban was officially lifted in Saudi Arabia that prevented women from driving, which meant that now women can drive in every nation. A main reason that this ban was lifted is due to economic implications. Currently, there is a plan of social and economic reform in Saudi…

Syria: Russia’s Hope for Relevance in the Middle East

By: Jared Lang From the conventional perspective on recent Russian foreign policy, getting involved in the Syrian Civil War appears to break from Putin’s playbook. When it comes to foreign conflicts, Putin has, since his ascendence to the Russian presidency in 2000, deployed armed forces almost exclusively in the countries immediately neighboring the Russian Federation…

Peak Oil Demand: Political and Economic Consequences

By: Ryan McGuine and Sam Alhadeff In 1956, Shell geologist M. King Hubbert predicted that American oil production would peak in 1970 and decline from then on and that worldwide production would do the same sometime around 2000. This narrative, known as “peak oil supply,” predicted that as humans use increasing amounts of oil, existing…

Are Missiles the Answer?

By: Ilana Friedman The conflict in Syria began in March 2011 with pro-democracy demonstrations against the harsh regime of President Bashar al-Assad. In August 2011, then-President Obama called for Assad to step down and also enforced new sanctions on the Syrian government. Allies of the United States — France, Germany, and the United Kingdom —…