Syria: Russia’s Hope for Relevance in the Middle East

By: Jared Lang From the conventional perspective on recent Russian foreign policy, getting involved in the Syrian Civil War appears to break from Putin’s playbook. When it comes to foreign conflicts, Putin has, since his ascendence to the Russian presidency in 2000, deployed armed forces almost exclusively in the countries immediately neighboring the Russian Federation…

Peak Oil Demand: Political and Economic Consequences

By: Ryan McGuine and Sam Alhadeff In 1956, Shell geologist M. King Hubbert predicted that American oil production would peak in 1970 and decline from then on and that worldwide production would do the same sometime around 2000. This narrative, known as “peak oil supply,” predicted that as humans use increasing amounts of oil, existing…

Are Missiles the Answer?

By: Ilana Friedman The conflict in Syria began in March 2011 with pro-democracy demonstrations against the harsh regime of President Bashar al-Assad. In August 2011, then-President Obama called for Assad to step down and also enforced new sanctions on the Syrian government. Allies of the United States — France, Germany, and the United Kingdom —…

Water Wars: How Water Scarcity Leads to Conflict

By: Jasmine Owens Although water makes up 70% of the Earth, only 3% of this water is freshwater. Of this 3%, about two-thirds is trapped in glaciers and is therefore unusable. This leaves about 1% of the world’s water supply to support a population of 7.7 billion people and counting, much of which is increasingly…

State Violence and the Palestinian Community

By: Arriana Dawidziak On March 30th, 2018 Israeli Forces and Palestinian protesters clashed, drawing attention to the ongoing Palestinian Occupation in the Middle East. While this has been the most recent news from the Israel-Palestine conflict, it is not the only sign of oppression in the area. The cases of Ahed Tamimi and abuse of…

Tomorrow’s Warfare, Held Back By Today

By: Sam Buisman Entering into a war is like stepping into a river: while the environment is familiar, your immediate surroundings are constantly changing. War always involves a number of opposing parties engaged in armed conflict, but the means by which it is waged have changed drastically over time. “Armed” embodies a different definition for…

The Veil Debate

By: Chandrea Baster The United States’ First Amendment, under the freedom of expression, prohibits legislation stemming from or against religious practices. It is virtually impossible to imagine federal laws infringing on an individual’s rights based on religious grounds. Precisely on this issue, there is a clear disparity between the US government and its Iranian counterpart….

Bolton Appointed: Middle East Policy Still Not Trump’s Priority

By: Danielle Schmitz Foreign policy under the Trump administration has often been unpredictable. This is especially apparent in the Middle East, where there has been no coherent policy initiative and often the policies have been seen as controversial and unpopular by the leaders and publics in the Middle East. Rather than build relationships and foster…

Iran’s CIA? A Strengthening IRGC Must Be Dealt With Prudence

By: Daniel Ramallo Since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, Iran has been adamant about exporting its revolution into the rest of the Arab World. Last month, in what was possibly Israel and Iran’s most heated exchange since the Syrian conflict began in 2011, Iran launched an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) drone into Israeli airspace that was…

Is Microfinance the Universal Poverty Reduction Tool?

By: Maggie Winding Microfinance and micro-loans have, since their conception, been hailed as a “miracle tool” for alleviating poverty in developing countries. Many, however, myself included, remain unconvinced that microfinance is necessarily the solution to resolving the vast disparity in economic achievement that many nations face. Therefore, as a deeper exploration of this topic, this article…