Could a Trump Impeachment be the Economy’s Worst Nightmare?

By: Fatima Ali As the impeachment inquiry continues, Americans are rightfully concerned about how the trial and a possible Trump impeachment could affect the American and global economy. The timeline of the impeachment investigation is very unpredictable.  Speaker Nancy Pelosi has stated that she has “no idea” if the investigation will conclude by the end…

The Cost of Democracy

By Juilin Lu After several months of struggle, the Hong Kong Anti-Extradition-Law movement has finally achieved some success. The Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced the formal withdrawal of the Extradition Bill in response to the five demands made by the protestors. To achieve this goal, the city has suffered a tremendous amount. The protests have…

Refusal to Pay UN Dues: A Danger to US Hegemony

By Cormac O’Harrow Since helping charter the United Nations in 1945, the United States has refused to pay its dues only a handful of times, most notably during the 1980s when President Reagan boycotted the addition of newly formed nations after centuries of colonization. Now, President Trump, in line with his ‘American First’ nationalist foreign…

India: A Growing, but Gendered, Economy

By Lauren Hutson India has one of the largest economies in the world and one that is quickly growing, with a GDP of 2.597 trillion (USD) and an annual GDP growth rate of 6.6%. These numbers starkly contrast women’s labor force participation and employment rates, however. The labor participation rate for women in India is…

All Roads Lead to Beijing

By Ryan Thiele “The ancient silk routes thrived in times of peace, but lost vigor in times of war. The pursuit of the Belt and Road Initiative requires a peaceful and stable environment.”  Those words, expressed in 2017 by President Xi Jinping of the People’s Republic of China, were to be the beginning of what…

For the Many, Not the Few: Labour’s Plan to Democratize the Workplace

By Daniel Zaydman In recent months, Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the United Kingdom (UK) Labour Party, and his Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer, John McDonnell, have unveiled a slew of new economic plans designed to drastically restructure the United Kingdom’s economy and close its soaring wealth gap. One of the most important plans, inclusive…

Battle of the Biofuels: Big Corn vs Big Oil

By: Kelli Liegel Big Oil and Big Corn cannot seem to compromise on the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) and the subsequent export-subsidies on RINs (Renewable Identification Number) that the Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt has proposed. The corn industry claims that Mr. Pruitt’s adverse export-subsidy proposals will drive corn prices down and crush farmers…

Peak Oil Demand: Political and Economic Consequences

By: Ryan McGuine and Sam Alhadeff In 1956, Shell geologist M. King Hubbert predicted that American oil production would peak in 1970 and decline from then on and that worldwide production would do the same sometime around 2000. This narrative, known as “peak oil supply,” predicted that as humans use increasing amounts of oil, existing…

Wir Schaffen Das: Is it a Reality?

By: Emily Janicik Angela Merkel’s famous slogan “wir schaffen das,” which she originally introduced in 2015 in response to the refugee crisis in Europe, translates in English to “we can do it.” After three years of tackling the difficult issue of world migration, however, many Germans are becoming disillusioned with this sentiment. In 2015, Germany…

Why the Stock Crash Should Not Matter to Policymakers

By: Jason Geissler When the Dow Jones falls 1,175 points in one day—the largest single-day drop in history—people are going to ask: what happened? A myriad of explanations have emerged as to just what could have caused the crash, such as this reasonable argument that this is a simple bubble collapse and that stock market…